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GEORGIA COLLEGE & STATE UNIVERSITY

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Recruiting at GC

Athletic recruitment at GC is a diverse process that looks to evaluate a prospective student-athlete in many different areas both on and off the field.

 

Libby Bochniak, a biology major and outside hitter for GC volleyball, said she was recruited after attending an academic showcase where clubs around the country competed for coaches from universities. After the showcase, she recalled GC beginning to express interest in her for the volleyball team. 

 

“They offered me a spot on the team [during] the summer of my junior year [of high school], and I said I wanted to accept that spot, which meant I wouldn’t talk to anybody else,” Bochniak said. “It’s a verbal commitment because you can’t sign until your senior year on signing day.”

 

 

Bochniak applied to GC in the fall and, after she was accepted, signed to the team on paper. Bochniak came to campus on an athletic scholarship that covered the costs of her meal plan her first year and rent her second year.

 

Athletic scholarships are divided among teams based on the allotted funding given to the school by the NCAA.

 

Numbers vary depending on the size of each team’s roster. The GC soccer team, for example, is only allowed to have 9.9 scholarships each year to help pay for student commodities such as housing and meal plans.

 

Wendell Staton, director of GC Athletics, said teams are able to use their scholarships effectively because of the HOPE scholarship.

 

“We know essentially going into the recruiting process that if you’re admitted into our university, the majority of your tuition will be paid for,” Staton said.

 

By stressing a solid academic profile for potential student athletes at GC, there is a certain precedent in the athletic department that all recruitment must also focus on an athlete’s potential to be a successful student.

 

Head soccer coach Hope Clark said that all her players have gone through a GC prospect camp which doubles as a tryout and college tour. This camps allows students who have been recruited by GC, both domestically and internationally, a chance to come to visit GC and have the full college experience.

 

“We give them a tour of GC’s campus, they eat on campus, and they’re really educated about the academic side of the university, so it’s all encompassing, and we’re selling GC and the soccer program,” Clark said.

 

Maurice Smith, head women’s basketball coach, said he believes that the best way for his team to be successful is by finding players with strong characters who best fit the values of GC as a school.

 

“More so than talent, we look for character,” Smith said. “Are they a good fit, and do they hold the same values that we hold? Are they unselfish, hardworking, coachable, great attitude, great teammate and are they willing to be a part of something bigger than themselves? That trumps everything more so than talent.”

 

Every prospective student athlete looking at GC is given a list of guidelines that the GC athletic department abides by for every single student athlete.

 

These guidelines include: recruit and retain outstanding people that align with GC and desire the GC experience, graduate our student athletes in four years, create a culture that promotes opportunities for a holistic and balanced student athlete experience that engages the community and inspires our student athletes to do the best they can academically, socially and athletically and put your family first and exude positivity, enthusiasm and professionalism.

 

Above all else it is important for GC recruiters to recruit athletes that will be successful in athletics as well as academics. Every student athlete at GC must be accepted into the school through the regular application process, even if they are offered a spot on the team before they are accepted.

 

Athletic recruitment at GC is a diverse process that looks to evaluate a prospective student-athlete in many different areas both on and off the field.

 

Libby Bochniak, a biology major and outside hitter for GC volleyball, said she was recruited after attending an academic showcase where clubs around the country competed for coaches from universities. After the showcase, she recalled GC beginning to express interest in her for the volleyball team. 

 

 

“They offered me a spot on the team [during] the summer of my junior year [of high school], and I said I wanted to accept that spot, which meant I wouldn’t talk to anybody else,” Bochniak said. “It’s a verbal commitment because you can’t sign until your senior year on signing day.”

 

Bochniak applied to GC in the fall and, after she was accepted, signed to the team on paper. Bochniak came to campus on an athletic scholarship that covered the costs of her meal plan her first year and rent her second year.

 

Athletic scholarships are divided among teams based on the allotted funding given to the school by the NCAA.

 

Numbers vary depending on the size of each team’s roster. The GC soccer team, for example, is only allowed to have 9.9 scholarships each year to help pay for student commodities such as housing and meal plans.

 

Wendell Staton, director of GC Athletics, said teams are able to use their scholarships effectively because of the HOPE scholarship.

 

“We know essentially going into the recruiting process that if you’re admitted into our university, the majority of your tuition will be paid for,” Staton said.

 

By stressing a solid academic profile for potential student athletes at GC, there is a certain precedent in the athletic department that all recruitment must also focus on an athlete’s potential to be a successful student.

 

Head soccer coach Hope Clark said that all her players have gone through a GC prospect camp which doubles as a tryout and college tour. This camps allows students who have been recruited by GC, both domestically and internationally, a chance to come to visit GC and have the full college experience.

 

“We give them a tour of GC’s campus, they eat on campus, and they’re really educated about the academic side of the university, so it’s all encompassing, and we’re selling GC and the soccer program,” Clark said.

 

Maurice Smith, head women’s basketball coach, said he believes that the best way for his team to be successful is by finding players with strong characters who best fit the values of GC as a school.

 

“More so than talent, we look for character,” Smith said. “Are they a good fit, and do they hold the same values that we hold? Are they unselfish, hardworking, coachable, great attitude, great teammate and are they willing to be a part of something bigger than themselves? That trumps everything more so than talent.”

 

Every prospective student athlete looking at GC is given a list of guidelines that the GC athletic department abides by for every single student athlete.

 

These guidelines include: recruit and retain outstanding people that align with GC and desire the GC experience, graduate our student athletes in four years, create a culture that promotes opportunities for a holistic and balanced student athlete experience that engages the community and inspires our student athletes to do the best they can academically, socially and athletically and put your family first and exude positivity, enthusiasm and professionalism.

 

Above all else it is important for GC recruiters to recruit athletes that will be successful in athletics as well as academics. Every student athlete at GC must be accepted into the school through the regular application process, even if they are offered a spot on the team before they are accepted.

Top photo courtesy of Wendell Stanton 

 

Bottom photo courtesy of GC Sports Information 

 

 

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